Understand What No Lawyer or Document Can Do For You

I was recently helping a client with a stock purchase in a deal that just felt wrong to me. Each time we asked a question or reviewed a document, it seemed additional issues, questions and concerns arose. Notwithstanding this fact, the investment bankers, company officers and selling stockholders assured us in each instance that there was no problem – usually with the excuse that it was simply bad record-keeping, a lack of attention to detail or a favorable related party transaction that would not adversely affect the company or my client going forward. In fact, they said, it was precisely because of these circumstances that my client had been presented with this amazing investment opportunity. I did not find these explanations to be persuasive or reassuring, even when the sellers agreed to provide a litany of warranties and representations, broad indemnification rights, and other contractual protections.

In this circumstance, I was compelled to explain to my client a very simple fact – while a lawyer can draft an all-encompassing contract in which virtually every possible risk is anticipated and addressed with detailed indemnifications, aggressive remedial provisions, escrows, etc., that does not turn a bad deal into a good one or provide the same level of protection as walking away from a bad deal.

The simple truth is, if your due diligence yields more questions than answers more uncertainty than certainty, and more risks than opportunities – and if you find yourself spending an inordinate amount of time and effort trying to protect yourself from known and unknown legal risks and possible bad behavior or misrepresentations by the other party (versus ordinary course business risks) – no amount of lawyering and no legal document can adequately protect you. In that case, you really only have 2 choices – (1) walk away from the deal, or (2) draft that over-the-top contract with all of the bells, whistles and protections and “hang on for the ride.” And if you opt for alternative 2, understand that a good lawyer and a good contract do not make a good deal.