Negotiating a Deal? Be a Mediator, Not a Gladiator

What’s the primary goal of most business negotiations? I don’t mean negotiations in the context of a dispute – I mean in the context of a prospective business deal or relationship. In that setting, the primary goal is to reach agreement. And that generally means emphasizing mutual benefit and necessary compromise to reach the desired outcome for both parties, not just one – after all, if your negotiations are so “successful” that the other party has lost everything, there’s really no reason for that party to proceed at all. In other words, you may “win” the negotiation battle but “lose” the deal.

So, how should a business person (and that business person’s lawyer) approach negotiations? Simply put, I think it’s better to assume the role of mediator than that of gladiator; be a problem-solver not a competitor. That doesn’t mean that you must avoid confrontation and disagreement in all cases. What it does mean is you should pick and choose your “battles” carefully; and where possible, avoid them entirely by finding creative solutions.

Negotiation is not generally possible without some level of disagreement. If that weren’t the case, we’d never need to exchange multiple drafts of an agreement, since all parties would simply agree to the first draft. Disagreement is not the problem. Confrontation, however, often times can be – particularly if it’s not handled with professionalism and diplomacy. If disagreement is necessary, try and explain to the other party why your position is reasonable, and why the issue is important. If it’s a potential “deal-breaker,” explain that too. In the end, I believe it’s most productive to avoid confrontation when you can. Disagree when it’s important, but even then seek compromise where it’s possible and makes business sense. Be creative and seek to find win-win solutions. Remember, the goal is to get the deal done on terms that benefit everyone – not walk away after “fighting a good fight.”

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