Be Careful When Contracting With Related Parties

Ever heard the expression, “Good fences make good neighbors.”?  I have a similar opinion as to contracts between related parties.  I’m talking about business contracts between parties who know and trust each other and may even be in related or competitive businesses.  Even in those circumstances, a clear and specific contract is important to avoid misunderstandings and effectuate the parties’ agreement.

Let me give you a recent real life scenario.  My “Client” is in a competitive and sophisticated commodity based business where a few pennies on the input or output side can mean millions of dollars and the difference between profitability and failure.  The Client is owned by a group of individuals that are also owners and operators of competitive businesses (the “Competitors”) in the same industry – this means the owners are both partners and competitors.  To further complicate things, a subset of the owners has a related company (the “Management Company”) that manages the commodity-based businesses (both the Client and the Competitors) for a fee.

So, the Client wants to enter into a contract under which the Management Company would manage the Client’s facilities – in addition to managing its own facilities and the Competitor’s facilities.  This arrangement is filled with conflicts of interest and competitive risks/concerns – in other words, this is a situation where the contract is critical.

I can’t discuss all of the key issues here, so I’ll focus on just a few.  The parties’ proposed contract said the Management Company:  (i) had complete discretion and authority to make decisions and enter into contracts binding on the Client; (ii) could use and share the Client’s confidential information with and for the Competitors’ and the Management Company’s own purposes; (iii) had no limits on competition, solicitation or the allocation of business opportunities; and (iv) had no stated standard of care.  In other words, the proposed contact was A RECIPE FOR DISASTER FOR THE CLIENT.

Now, as it turns out, none of the above provisions accurately reflected the parties’ intentions.  However, because they know each other well and trust each other, they thought they could cobble together any document labeled “Management Agreement,” and they’d just work things out as they went along.  When presented with a series of “what-if” questions, the parties quickly realized that this contract needed a lot of work, and we included provisions addressing the above issues and several others.  The result is a contract that clearly sets forth the parties’ rights and obligations and anticipates and addresses the circumstances that might otherwise result in disputes.  In other words, a contract that facilitates and builds their business relationship rather than threatening it.

Keep in mind that contracts between related parties often present the same (and sometimes even more) risks as other contracts.  Make sure you take care when entering into them – for everyone’s benefit.

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